Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 31
Like Tree4Likes

Thread: Concerning Bath Salts -

  1. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    63
    The scary thing is that ANYTHING that will get an addict or someone with an addictive personality high becomes a "rave" or "popular favorite" especially if it's cheap and can be bought over the counter. Unfortunately they come with GRAVE consequences!!!!

    I mean think about it, who even came up with alcohol or opiates or marijuana in the first place...someone who obviously also was eating, smoking, snorting and probably shooting a whole lotta other stuff that didnt get them high too!!! Scary shit no doubt!!!!

    I try to educate my kids and younger peeps on NOT experimenting as a human guinnea pig with stuff that is not regulated or measured. For instance at least with alcohol you know on the bottle what is the amount of liquor in each. Versus magic mushrooms that could be literally ANY kind of mushroom including poisonous ones, and have NOTHING that communicates how much is too much...

    Education is super important in the understanding of and prevention of addictions and overdoses. Look at Prince! Fentanyl is a very very dangerous synthetic opiate, and even tho it's measured out for someone prescribed it that is typically not how someone is taking it to get high and a tiny tiny amount can literally be lethal...as it sadly was with one of the worlds most beloved and now late musical artists.

    Bath salts....yuck!!! Might as well be scraping bath scum and seeing if that gets you high right? Prayers we can educate people, especially young ones, to say NO to crap like this!!!

    God Bless All!

    tdb

  2. #22
    Moderator
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    247

    Amen, babydoll!

    Amen, babydoll!

    An aside: You mentioned Fentanyl. I actually had a personal experience with Fentanyl, which nearly cost me my life. I'd been given methadone for many years due to fibromyalgia and my pain dr wanted me off it. Therefore, he put me on a low-dose of Fentynal patch. The dosage was increased by doubling as there was no pain relief. Well, the patch leaked! And I ended up in the hospital with doctors struggling to save me.

    It took several weeks before I could get out of "zombie-like" symptoms. I had been hallucinating, and my physical symptoms were off-the-chart. I ended up with 3 blood clots very near the heart. They had to watch me closely for a year and half.

    Very scary.

    Sorry, this really doesn't have anything to do with subject at hand, but it's just a warning, to find a gentlemanly doctor who will advocate for you when you're unable. And, read, read, and research your own before trying something.

    ~4tracy
    Welcome. Please know this is a safe place. Feel free to share.

    ~4tRACY520

  3. #23
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Las Cruces, NM... the city of the Crosses
    Posts
    26

    Bath Salt slang

    Somebody asked about Slang terms for these drugs other than the name, bath salts, are insect repellent, pond scum remover, jewelry cleaner, plant food, toy cleaner and bubbles. Known product names include Cloud 9, Ocean, Charge Plus, White Lightning, Scarface, Red Dove, White Dove, Ivory Wave, Pure Ivory, Hurricane Charlie, Ivory Coast, Purple Wave, Vanilla Sky, Bliss, Blue Silk, Zoom, Bloom, Ocean Snow, Lunar Wave and Energy 1.

    I tried a few.. DUMB

  4. #24
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    40

    About bath salts and scare tactics

    I lived in the UK for a few years. Just wanted to give my take on the bath salts issue. Mephedrone is a very popular drug amongst certain people in the Uk and has been for some time.

    Must be 6 years now and I have come into contact with hundreds if not thousands of people who were either on the drug or coming down and I have NEVER seen anyone act like this. I have seen them agitated and a bit jittery after prolonged usage.

    It's easy enough to blame an untested drug but surely there was something mentally not right with the person chewing the face.

    I'm not defending it but there really needs to be more proper testing done rather than these scaremonger tactics.

  5. #25
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    40
    I think the bigger problem with mixed bags like bath salts is the amount of byproduct in them. You don't know that it's just mephedrone. You don't know what sleep deprivation will unleash when combined with an anxious, already paranoid or violent personality when in combination with these substances. There are too many variables and not enough information -- about what is in each packets, what the right dosage is, how to tell someone is overdosing, what to do, etc.

  6. #26
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    40

    Not Sure Where I got this...

    I found something I had downloaded a while back. Unfortunately, I neglected to download the source, but it looks to be from some type of medical discussion of sorts. In any case, I'll just throw it up here for those who wish to read it. Also not sure how old the material is.



    Bath Salts or PABS Common or street names: Flakka, Ivory Wave, Vanilla Sky, Cloud Nine, Blue Silk, Purple Sky, Bliss, Purple Wave, Red Dove, Zoom, Bloom, Ocean Snow, Lunar Wave, White Lightening, Scarface, Hurricane Charlie, Drone, Energy¬1, Meow Meow, Sextasy, Ocean Burst, Pure Ivory, Snow Leopard, Stardust, White Night, White Rush, Charge Plus, White Dove, plant fertilizer, plant food


    What are "Bath Salts"?

    Psychoactive bath salts (PABS) are a designer drug of abuse that has led to reports of dangerous intoxication from emergency departments across the US. "Bath salts" are not a hygiene product, as the name might imply.

    "Bath salts" are central nervous system stimulants that inhibit the norepinephrinedopamine reuptake system and can lead to serious, and even fatal adverse reactions.

    The most commonly reported ingredient in "bath salts" is methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), although other stimulants may be present, such as mephedrone and pyrovalerone.

    MDPV is of the phenethylamine class and is structurally similar to cathinone, an alkaloid found in the khat plant and methamphetamine. Mephedrone has been reported to have a high potential for overdose.

    On September 7, 2011 the US Drug Enforcement Agency announced emergency scheduling to control MDPV, mephedrone and methylone, all chemicals found in "bath salts".

    In July of 2012, U.S. President Barack Obama signed into law a ban on mephedrone, methylone and MDVP, all chemicals found in "bath salts, by placing them on the Schedule I controlled substances list.

    Schedule I controlled substances cannot be sold under any circumstances and cannot be prescribed for medical purposes. The law also bans any future designer chemical compounds meant to mimic the effects of bath salts. Having possession or selling these chemicals or any product that contains them is illegal in the US.

    How do "Bath Salts" work?

    MDVP is structurally related to methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and cathinone derivatives. MDMA is a schedule I hallucinogenic substance and cathinone derivatives (cathinone, methcathinone) are listed as schedule I stimulants.

    Animals studies have demonstrated elevated levels of extracellular dopamine 60 minutes after admininstration of MDVP. Before the DEA ruling, "bath salts" were noted to be easily accessible in convenience stores, gas stations, over the Internet and in "head" or smoke shops.

    "Bath salts", packaged in powder form in small plastic or foil packages of 200 to 500 milligrams, sold for roughly $20 per package. Most packages were labeled "not for human consumption".

    The "bath salt" powder appeared white, off¬white or slightly yellow¬colored.

    "Bath salts" are noted for producing a "high" similar to methamphetamine and have been called "lama signed into law a ban on mephedrone, methylone and MDVP, all chemicals found in "bath salts, by placing them on the Schedule I controlled substances list.

    Schedule I controlled substances cannot be sold under any circumstances and cannot be prescribed for medical purposes.

    The law also bans any future designer chemical compounds meant to mimic the effects of bath salts. Having possession or selling these chemicals or any product that contains them is illegal in the US.

    How do "Bath Salts" work?

    MDVP is structurally related to methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and cathinone derivatives. MDMA is a schedule I hallucinogenic substance and cathinone derivatives (cathinone, methcathinone) are listed as schedule I stimulants.

    Animals studies have demonstrated elevated levels of extracellular dopamine 60 minutes after admininstration of MDVP.

    Before the DEA ruling, "bath salts" were noted to be easily accessible in convenience stores, gas stations, over the Internet and in "head" or smoke shops. "Bath salts", packaged in powder form in small plastic or foil packages of 200 to 500 milligrams, sold for roughly $20 per package.

    Most packages were labeled "not for human consumption". The "bath salt" powder appeared white, off¬white or slightly yellow¬colored. "Bath salts" are noted for producing a "high" similar to methamphetamine and have been called "legal cocaine".

    "Bath salt" users usually snort the drug intranasally, but it can also been injected, smoked, orally ingested or used rectally. Effects may occur with doses as low as 3 to 5 milligrams, but average doses range from 5 to 20 milligrams.

    There is a great risk for overdose because retail packages may contain up to 500 milligrams. If ingested orally, absorption is rapid with a peak "rush" at 1.5 hours, the effect lasting 3 to 4 hours, then a hard "crash".

    The total "bath salts" experience may last upwards of 8 hours. Reports from emergency departments note that "bath salt" use can lead to sympathetic nervous system 1 2 1 3 4 1 effects such as tachycardia (fast heart rate), hypertension (high blood pressure), hyperthermia (elevated body temperature), seizures (convulsions).

    Death has been reported. Altered mental status may present as severe panic attacks, agitation, paranoia, delusions, hallucinations, and violent behavior (including selfmutilation, suicide attempts and homicidal activity.)

    Extent of Bath Salt Use

    The full extent of "bath salt" abuse is not known. In addition to use in the US, DEA reports of illicit MDPV use have been noted in Europe and Australia.

    The first reports of MDPV seizure was from Germany in 2007. The United Kingdom, Australia, Canada and Israel have banned the chemicals.

    According to the DEA, the first US reports came in during 2009. From 2010 to 2011, reports in the US increased dramatically. As of March 22, 2011, poison control centers in 45 states and the District of Columbia had received calls related to "bath salts".

    In the first 3 months of 2011, US poison control centers have received 5 times as many calls relating to "bath salts" as compared to the total number of calls in 2010.

    In 2015, authorities in Florida have cited the use of a new type of cathinone called 'flakka" that illicits a delusional state in it's users.

    Prior to the federal ban, many states had enacted their own bans on at least some of the chemicals found in "bath salts". Marquette County, Michigan took quick and local action to restrict abuse of "bath salts" in February of 2011 due to a rash of emergency admissions from November 2010 through March 2011. An emergency public health order was executed by the Marquette County Health Department to allow seizure of "bath salts" from a local store.

    Subsequent testing found that the products contained MDPV. Among 35 patients, 17 were hospitalized, and one died. The median age of the patient was 28 years (range 20¬55 years), with men accounting for 54% of admissions.

    Twenty¬four of these 35 patients (69%) had a selfreported history of drug abuse, 16 patients (46%) had a history of mental illness, and six patients (17%) reported suicidal thoughts or attempts that may have been related to "bath salt" use.

    Bath Salt Health Hazards

    The pharmacological activity of MDPV, and related chemicals may result in serious and ...


    Sorry, that's the end of my download. Hope it helped somehow.
    mcd2830 likes this.

  7. #27
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    40

    OK, found something else I saved in a WORD doc...

    Again, take it for what it's worth... not at all sure where i got it. Doesn't matter. I think the subject has been beaten down enough. I'll just post it here for any interteted parties. A couple of interesting points on this one...




    Confusing. Is this what we put in our bathtubs, like Epsom salts? No. But by marketing them as bath salts and labeling them 'not for human consumption,' they have been able to avoid them being specifically enumerated as illegal," says Zane Horowitz, MD, an emergency room physician and medical director of the Oregon Poison Center.

    According to the Drug Enforcement Administration, the most common active ingredients in bath salts are mephedrone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone. Mephedrone (MEF-uh-drone) is a synthetic stimulant that produces effects similar to amphetamines and cocaine. There have been no formal studies into the effects of mephedrone on humans, but it is reported to cause euphoria, sexual stimulation and improved focus. Negative side effects abound, including erratic behavior, breathing difficulty, agitation, anxiety, paranoia and depression.

    Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (METH-uh-leen-di-OX-ee-PY-ro-VAL-uh-rone, or MDPV) is a psychotropic euphoriant. It is said to be stronger than Ritalin and cocaine. Though it has not been studied, users report desired effects as euphoria, increased alertness, increased motivation and sociability. Side effects include anxiety, dizziness, breathing difficulty, the persistence of a ringing sound in the ears, confusion, severe vomiting, anxiety, agitation, violent behavior, and suicidal thoughts. Some repeated users remain awake and paranoid for several days.

    Bath salts may also contain cathinone, which is a lot like ephedrine and other amphetamines; pyrovalerone, a highly addictive psychoative stimulant used for the clinical treatment of chronic fatigue as well as an appetite suppressant; the stimulant CFT, which is structurally similar to cocaine, but far more potent and known to last longer; naphyrone and desoxypipradrol (2-diphenylmethylpiperidine or 2-dPMP), stimulants that act similarly to reuptake inhibitors (used commonly to treat depression).

    Several reports suggest that bath salts cause hallucinations and delusions, going as far as to describe them as the "new LSD," but David DiSalvo, a science writer at Forbes disputes that bath salts are hallucinogens:

    Neither of these drugs are hallucinogens like LSD. Hallucinogens are psychoactive drugs, but not all psychoactive drugs are hallucinogens -- the primary difference being that hallucinogens induce changes in perception that are significantly different than normal consciousness, not merely an amplification of conscious states we already experience.



    Mark Ryan, the director of the Poison Center in Louisiana, a state that has been ravaged by bath salts, puts more emphasis on the results of consumption than what makes up the contents of these little brightly-colored packets.

    One recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention discovered that the majority of users that ended up in the emergency room following an overdose had injected the drugs, suggesting that dosage remains one of the biggest associated concerns. Of those 500 milligrams in each bag, five to ten milligrams are said to be enough, but with no instruction or awareness as to usage, overdose remains a very real concern.

    Slang terms for these drugs other than bath salts are insect repellent, pond scum remover, jewelry cleaner, plant food, toy cleaner and bubbles. Known product names include Cloud 9, Ocean, Charge Plus, White Lightning, Scarface, Red Dove, White Dove, Ivory Wave, Pure Ivory, Hurricane Charlie, Ivory Coast, Purple Wave, Vanilla Sky, Bliss, Blue Silk, Zoom, Bloom, Ocean Snow, Lunar Wave and Energy 1.

    In 2009, no calls were made to U.S. Poison Control Centers regarding use of bath salts. In 2010, the reports numbered 303. Last year, incidents associated with bath salts were up to 5,625.

    "This is an emerging health threat that needs to be taken seriously," Alvin C. Bronstein, medical director of the Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center and acting director of toxic surveillance for the American Association of Poison Control Centers, said in a press release.

    Late last year, the DEA banned some of the most common chemicals in bath salts. According to a bulletin about bath salts posted by the Drug Enforcement Administration on October 21, 2011:

    The United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) today exercised its emergency scheduling authority to control three synthetic stimulants (Mephedrone, 3,4 methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) and Methylone) used to make products marketed as "bath salts" and "plant food". Except as authorized by law, this action makes possessing and selling these chemicals, or the products that contain them, illegal in the United States. This emergency action was necessary to prevent an imminent threat to the public safety. The temporary scheduling action will remain in effect for at least one year while the DEA and the United States Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) further study whether these chemicals should be permanently controlled.

    In the last six months, DEA has received an increasing number of reports from poison control centers, hospitals and law enforcement regarding products containing one or more of these chemicals. Thirty-seven states have already taken action to control or ban these or other synthetic stimulants. The Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984 amends the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) to allow the DEA Administrator to temporarily schedule an abused, harmful, non-medical substance in order to avoid an imminent hazard to public safety while the formal rule-making procedures described in the CSA are being conducted.

    "This action demonstrates our commitment to keeping our streets safe from these and other new and emerging drugs that have decimated families, ruined lives, and caused havoc in communities across the country," said DEA Administrator Michele M. Leonhart. "These chemicals pose a direct and significant threat, regardless of how they are marketed, and we will aggressively pursue those who attempt their manufacture and sale."

    This ban will remain in effect until October of this year while the DEA decides whether the situation warrants an extension or a more permanent solution. Thus far, street chemists have been able to get around this and various state bans by using derivatives of the banned chemicals in their bath salts.

    The words "not for human consumption" on those packages also present a legal impediment: if bath salts did not come with such a warning, they could technically be considered a scheduled drug under the Controlled Substances Act's Federal Analogue Act (title 21 of section 813) because many of their components are analogous (or comparable) to already scheduled substances.

    Because of the labeling, however, it is only possible to prosecute the sale or possession synthetic drugs that do not fall under the DEA's or individual states' bans if it can be proved that these are intended to be used for human consumption.

    The U.S. is not the only country being affected. These synthetic designer drugs, created to get around the law, are becoming a problem around the world. In their 2011 report, the International Narcotics Control Board reported that 41 new psychoactive substances had been identified across the European Union in 2010, almost doubling the number that was reported the previous year. In Australia, the surge of new drugs has resulted in new import authorization requirements for 11 substances that are not yet under international control. Mephedrone was among them.

    Will the law manage to keep up with this rogue chariot of chemistry that is being spurred around the world by the prospect of incredible financial gain? Will regulation make substances difficult to acquire for scientists who have legitimate reasons for using the chemicals that are processed into these designer drugs? Have we seen the worst of these drugs' effects?
    mcd2830 likes this.

  8. #28
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Posts
    63
    I've been in and out of recovery since my teens, tho I've been sober and in recovery for years now by the grace of God!

    I remember saying years ago "if bathtub scum could get me high I'd be addicted to it!"...I was joking!!! OMG first of all I have to wonder who the f*&! even started using bathsalts to get high, like do people out there experiment with everything in their cupboard and bathroom vanity to see what works and what doesnt'...Jesus!!! Help us!!!!

    Bath salts, spice, crap!!! Why would anyone in their right mind do this crap, I'd rather see people just smoke pot than this!!! I'm glad it's illegal, getting crap like this off the streets is the first step along with education...

    Glad those of us here that have tried this stuff are still here to talk about it!! Like HolyJames said, there ARE people who have died from this junk!!

    Prayers to all!

    tdb
    mcd2830 likes this.

  9. #29
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Abbeville, Louisiana
    Posts
    81
    Quote Originally Posted by michelle11j View Post
    Is this what we put in our bathtubs, like Epsom salts? No. But by marketing them as bath salts and labeling them 'not for human consumption,' they have been able to avoid them being specifically enumerated as illegal," says Zane Horowitz, MD, an emergency room physician and medical director of the Oregon Poison Center.


    Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (METH-uh-leen-di-OX-ee-PY-ro-VAL-uh-rone, or MDPV) is a psychotropic euphoriant. It is said to be stronger than Ritalin and cocaine.

    Side effects include anxiety, dizziness, breathing difficulty, the persistence of a ringing sound in the ears, confusion, severe vomiting, anxiety, agitation, violent behavior, and suicidal thoughts. Some repeated users remain awake and paranoid for several days.


    Several reports suggest that bath salts cause hallucinations and delusions, going as far as to describe them as the "new LSD,"


    Mark Ryan, the director of the Poison Center in Louisiana, a state that has been ravaged by bath salts, puts more emphasis on the results of consumption than what makes up the contents of these little brightly-colored packets.......

    Thanks for posting these 2 articles, Michelle!


    Louisiana ravaged by bath salts... fer sher!

    Seriously, guys were running around saying it was the "POOR MAN'S COCAINE" - as tho THAT was a good thing!

    Hell, I know of 2 people...

    the first, a girl, started humping anything and everything at the cemetery - that's where she snorted bath salts. She was humping everything... HUGE CROSSES, STATUES, TREE BRANCHES...

    MAN! She messed herself up so bad, she had to have surgery to fix everything. and they say shje never got fixed right. i know they're in some program now to have a kid, and it aint working.

    The other one, a guy, lost it. He hallucinated so bad that night, his first, he ended up losing his mind.

    Yeah, cocaine.

    My a--!

    That junkj was dangerous!

    oh, and babydoll, read it again, girlfriend.

    you are right tho... if it get u high... peeps gonna try it.

  10. #30
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Abbeville, Louisiana
    Posts
    81

    Huh, guess i did talk about it before... On 5/30

    Quote Originally Posted by mcd2830 View Post
    Yeah, I could write a book!

    My rehab center counselor in Abbeville sez that Louisiana got hit REALLY HARD by this s....

    She sez that junk makes one of the the worst poison centers have ever seen. The psychosis some users have had is really scary. People high on these drugs have done some really bizarre things to themselves and hurt others around them.

    I used to be able to run down to the gas station, or 7-11, or a truck stop, and my friend has found them in head shops and online. I paid anywhere from $20-$50 for a bag that was about 500 milligrams.

    It looks like crystalized powder. Some of the stuff was white or brownish, and some of it was speckled. Bath salts - which isn't REALLY bath salts, but its cuz of the way they look. Most people snorted it, and some swallowed it. A few of my froiends even shot up.

    The first time I tried it, I ended up in the hospital cuz I took too much. Youre only supposed to take 5-10 ml but I took way too much.

    My dumb luck. Or stupidity.

    Forgot what i said, lol!


    Gettin' old.... or too much junk? eh

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •