Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
Like Tree2Likes

Thread: Sos! Help!

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Tx
    Posts
    23

    Sos! Help!

    Hi everyone,

    I donít know if any of you can help me but Iíve been really having a problem sleeping at night ever since I got out of the hospital. When I do sleep, I almost always wake up to a nightmare. Itís like Iím sleepwalking all the time.

    When Iím ready for bed, I may fall asleep, but only for a few minutes, then Iím wide awake again. When I finally get to sleep, I sleep too long or I am in a fog all day.

    Another thing, my legs twitch now when Iím tired.

    My counselor suggested sleeping pills, but they donít work. I guess Iíve taken so many, for so many years, my body just doesnít absorb them Ė or something. I donít know.

    Since Iíve been in this outpatient rehab home, my thinking has been so fuzzy, I canít even think straight. Sometimes, I remember how good I slept when I was drinking, and to be honest, I miss it. Yeah, thatís not good thinking. I sure donít want to go back. Drying out was almost the worst thing I ever did.

    Anybody got any ideas Ė tips??

  2. #2
    Moderator
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    247
    KIT, what youíre experiencingÖ is actually a GOOD sign. Your body is in early recovery. It will soon Ė I promise Ė return to a NORMAL sleep pattern, and once you reach that point, keep in mind that YOU are finally settling into the SOBER LIFE you were meant to live.

    Now, that doesnít mean your life will be perfect Ė far from it. What it means is that you will have your FACULTIES about you. You will experience life more fully, with all its ups and downs. Your body will work WITH you and not against you. Life will be sweeter, and you will be more capable of dealing with this roller coaster we call life.

    Sleep problems in early recovery is very common. Struggling with insomnia and having a disturbed sleep pattern is very normal. It can lead to tiredness and fatigue during the day; it can also increase the experience of fuzzy thinking that people often complain about when they first become sober, as you mentioned. Most people find that once they have been sober for a few weeks they regain the ability to enjoy a full nightís sleep. As I said, you are beginning to return to A SOBER LIFE.


    As you mentioned, you are experiencing some of these symptoms of sleep problems in early recovery, which can include:

    * Struggling to get to sleep at night
    * Repeatedly waking up during the night
    * Waking up in the middle of the night and being unable to return to sleep
    * Having dreams that are disturbing
    * Feeling tired and drowsy during the day
    * Spending an excessive number of hours sleeping
    * Not feeling refreshed after sleep
    * Inability to sleep because of racing thoughts
    * Falling asleep during the day



    There are a number of reasons for why people experience sleep problems in early recovery including:

    * Alcohol and drugs have been influencing the individualís sleeping pattern for many years. It can take the body a bit of time to adjust to a normal sleep cycle that is not chemically induced.

    * The symptoms of withdrawal can be uncomfortable and these may keep people awake at night.

    * Those people who have been abusing sleep medications may find that it takes a bit of time before they are able to once again sleep naturally.

    * People can find sleep difficult if they are too worried about their future. The transition from addiction to sober living is a one to make.

    * Those people who are staying in a rehab may be kept awake because of staying in a strange environment and sharing it with other people. They may also find that the expected sleep routine of the rehab does not fit in with their normal pattern.

    * And as you mentioned, certain symptoms of withdrawal such as restless leg syndrome Ė twitching - can interfere with the normal sleep pattern.

    * It is important that people get plenty of exercise during the day.


    You must watch for the following signs. Seek out help immediately. Insomnia in early recovery can be dangerous for a number of reasons including:

    * It can lead to symptoms of depression
    * It causes people to become irritable and moody
    * It can make the individual more accident prone
    * The individual will not have the energy to do the things they want to do during the day
    * If insomnia continues the individual may begin to have hallucinations
    * It can lead to anxiety problems
    * The newly sober person may take it as a sign that life in recovery is not satisfying
    * It may increase the risk of relapse



    There are some things that people can do to increase their chances of getting a good sleep at night including:

    * One of the most important tools that people need to develop in early recovery is the ability to manage stress. These stress management strategies will help people sleep better at night.

    * It is highly recommended that people avoid all caffeinated drinks from the late afternoon onwards.

    * Developing a sleeping schedule and sticking to it. This means deciding on an appropriate time to go to bed and to wake up.

    * It is not a good idea to spend hours lying awake in bed because the brain begins to associate being in bed with being awake. If people find that they are unable to sleep the best idea is to get out of the bed and do something relaxing like reading a book.

    * People should avoid having a TV or any other type of entertainment in their bedroom. This is to mentally reinforce the idea that going to bed is about going to sleep.

    * It is best if people avoid daytime napping.

    * People should try to create a relaxing environment prior to going to bed so that this puts them in the right mood for sleep. This could mean dimming the lights and listening to relaxing music.

    * Some people find that drinking hot milk or chamomile tea before going to bed helps them sleep.

    * It is not a good idea to eat a large meal within a few hours before going to bed.

    * Relaxation techniques such as meditation and yoga can help people sleep better at night. Practicing one of these techniques prior to bed may help ensure a more restful night.


    Hope that helps! We're pulling for you, Kit!


    ~4tRACY


    smiley-sleepless.jpg
    kitwarelotus likes this.
    Welcome. Please know this is a safe place. Feel free to share.

    ~4tRACY520

  3. #3
    Moderator
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    247

    Forgot to add...

    Forgot my old friend - MELATONIN!

    Found at any drug store or grocery store...

    For insomnia: 2 mg to 3 mg of melatonin before bedtime for up to 29 weeks has been used in most research. Higher doses of up to 12 mg daily have also been used for shorter durations (up to 4 weeks)


    http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-940-melatonin.aspx?activeingredientid=940
    kitwarelotus likes this.
    Welcome. Please know this is a safe place. Feel free to share.

    ~4tRACY520

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Tx
    Posts
    23
    Thanks, going to try Melatonin tonight.

    I will print the list out. Appreciate your help.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Lansing, MIchigan
    Posts
    37
    Hey, I'm gonna check that out. Sounds like it might help. Thanks.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Tx
    Posts
    23
    Quote Originally Posted by kitwarelotus View Post
    Thanks, going to try Melatonin tonight.

    I will print the list out. Appreciate your help.

    Not sure if its too early or not, but last night WAS a little better. Will update.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    34
    MELATONIN REALLY WORKS, I take it every night.


  8. #8
    Moderator
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    247
    Quote Originally Posted by kitwarelotus View Post
    Not sure if its too early or not, but last night WAS a little better. Will update.

    Let us know!

    holyjames62, that's great. How much do you take? Do you feel any side effects?
    Welcome. Please know this is a safe place. Feel free to share.

    ~4tRACY520

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    28
    What works for me is i have rituals...

    i do everything exactly the same to get ready for bed. for example, I put on the exact same lullaby music before i fall asleep, I take a hot bath, and others...

    no tv in bedroom, and sometimes, no tv 3 hours before if stressing.

    as soon as i climb into bed my eyes are heavy.

    hope that helps.

  10. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    16
    Great ideas!

    As i've had trouble for YEARS with getting enough sleep, one of my favorite classes in rehab was on getting to sleep.

    Here's my list that I use all the time:

    Keep the temperate down..really helps

    Keep your sleeping space clutter-free.

    When you're in bedroom dim the lights.

    Turn off all digital devices an hour before bed and keep off til morning.

    No pets in the bedroom!

    No late night eating




    That should help!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •